Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

June 22 2015

karren46

Hammer Toe Treatments Without Surgery

Hammer ToeOverview

The term Hammer toes describes three unique contracture deformities of the toes. The deformities differ by the location of contracture in each joint of the toe. The three deformities include hammer toe, claw toe and mallet toe. Hammer toes may be flexible or rigid. Hammer toes are most common on the lesser toes (2-5) and may affect one or more toes simultaneously. Hallux malleus is the term used to described a hammer toe of the great toe. Hallux malleus is often found as an isolated foot problem. Hammer toes are found equally in men and women. The onset hammertoes of hammer toes is between the ages of 30 and 80 years of age.

Causes

Poorly fitting shoes and muscle imbalances are the most common causes of hammertoe. When shoes are too narrow or do not accommodate the shape and size of your feet, they often contort the position of your toes. Choosing a shoe that fits is very important when it comes to avoiding foot problems like bunions or hammertoe. Having your toes bent for an extended period of time in a shoe that is too narrow or small forces your toes to adapt to the cramped space. With time, the muscles in your feet become accustomed to holding the flexed position of your toes, making it harder, or even impossible to straighten them.

HammertoeSymptoms

The symptoms of hammertoe include a curling toe, pain or discomfort in the toes and ball of the foot or the front of the leg, especially when toes are stretched downward. Thickening of the skin above or below the affected toe with the formation of corns or calluses. Difficulty finding shoes that fit well. In its early stages, hammertoe is not obvious. Frequently, hammertoe does not cause any symptoms except for the claw-like toe shape.

Diagnosis

Most health care professionals can diagnose hammertoe simply by examining your toes and feet. X-rays of the feet are not needed to diagnose hammertoe, but they may be useful to look for signs of some types of arthritis (such as rheumatoid arthritis) or other disorders that can cause hammertoe.

Non Surgical Treatment

Your podiatrist may recommend one or more of these treatments to manage your hammer toes. Wear shoes with roomy toe boxes which don?t force your toes together. Exercises to stretch and strengthen muscles in the toes. Over the counter toe straps, cushions, and corn pads. Custom orthotic inserts. Toe caps or toe slings. In severe cases, surgery to release the muscles in the affected toes.

Surgical Treatment

Your podiatrist may recommend a surgical procedure if your hammertoes are not helped by the conservative care methods listed above. Surgery for hammertoes is performed to help straighten your crooked toe. Your surgery will be performed in your podiatrist?s office or at a hospital, depending on the severity of your hammertoe. A metal pin is sometimes used to help your affected toe maintain its straight position during your recovery.
Tags: Hammertoe

June 05 2015

karren46

How To Remove Bunions Without Surgery

Overview
Bunions callous A bunion is a bony lump on the side of your foot, which develops when your big toe starts to angle towards your second toe. The bunion will eventually cause you discomfort and pain. The skin over the lump can become red, blistered or infected. A fluid-filled space called a bursa may also develop under your skin in this area and this can be painful if it becomes inflamed. This is called bursitis. The deformity of your big toe combined with a bunion is sometimes referred to as hallux valgus.

Causes
Various factors, including a tight gastrocnemius (or calf) muscle and instability of the arch, contribute to formation of bunions. The tight calf muscle is often hereditary and can cause a bunion because it forces more loading, or pressure, on the forefoot. Ultimately, this can contribute to instability in the bones, ligaments and tendons that form the arch. When it?s unstable, the arch starts collapsing and the metatarsal can shift. Arch instability can also be brought on by obesity, again, due to chronic overloading of the foot. But, by far, the most common contributing factor is childbirth. Bunions are most common in women who have had children. This happens because the hormones that affect their pelvis during childbirth also affect their feet. The hormone is called relaxin, and it allows bones to move and spread. Over time, it can cause the structure of a woman?s feet to gradually stretch and the metatarsal to shift.

Symptoms
A bunion, also called a hallux valgus, is a bony prominence on the inside of the big toe, caused by a misalignment of the joint. The overlying skin maybe swollen, red and tender. Bunions are often painful and can limit what shoes you can wear.

Diagnosis
Your doctor will be able to diagnose a bunion by asking about your symptoms and examining your feet. You may also have blood tests to rule out any other medical conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout, although this is rare. Your doctor may refer you to a podiatrist or chiropodist (healthcare professionals who specialise in conditions that affect the feet).

Non Surgical Treatment
Patients who suffer from bunions are usually referred to a surgeon. Unfortunately, surgery often makes the problem worse. Surgeons will use x-ray technology as a diagnostic tool, which does not always properly diagnose the pain source. Another problem with this approach is that it does not do anything to strengthen the weakened ligament in the foot and, thus, does not alleviate the chronic pain that people with this condition experience. Another standard practice of modern medicine is to use steroids or to prescribe anti-inflammatory medications. However, in the long run, these treatments do more damage than good. Cortisone shots and anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to produce short-term pain benefit, but both result in long-term loss of function and even more chronic pain by actually inhibiting the healing process of soft tissues and accelerating cartilage degeneration. Plus, long-term use of these drugs can lead to other sources of chronic pain, allergies and leaky gut syndrome. Bunions

Surgical Treatment
The type of surgical procedure performed depends upon the severity of the bunion, the individual?s age, general health, activity level, and the condition of the bones and connective tissue. Other factors may influence the choice of a procedure used. Mild bunion. For this type of surgery, the surgeon may remove the enlarged portion of bone and realign the muscles, tendons, and ligaments surrounding the joint. Moderate bunion. For a moderate bunion, the surgeon may cut the bone and shift it to its proper position. Whether or not the bone is cut depends on the severity and location of the deformity. In addition, the surrounding tendons and ligaments may need to be repositioned. Severe bunion. For a severe bunion, surgery may involve removing the enlarged portion of the bone, cutting and realigning the bone, and correcting the position of the tendons and ligaments. Arthritic bunion or big toe joint. If the joint is damaged beyond repair, as is commonly seen in arthritis, it may need to be reconstructed or replaced with an artificial joint. Joint replacement implants may be used in the reconstruction of the big toe joint.
Tags: Bunions

May 31 2015

karren46

Overpronation Of The Foot

Overview

Overpronation is when the foot rolls in excessively, or at a time when it should not, for instance late in the stance phase of gait. In this case much weight is transferred to the inner or medial side of the foot, and as the runner moves forward the load is borne by the inner edge rather than the ball of the foot. This destabilises the foot, which will attempt to regain stability by compensating for the inward movement. In a kind of chain reaction, this in turn affects the biomechanical efficiency of the leg, especially the knee and hip.Over Pronation

Causes

Over-pronation occurs when the foot collapses too far inward stressing the plantar fascia (the area underneath the arch of the foot.) Normally, one pronates every time he or she walks, but excessive pronation is called over-pronation. When this occurs it can cause pain in the feet, knees, hips, low back and even the shoulder. Decreasing over-pronation, which is very prominent in runners, will help add endurance, speed and efficiency to your run and ultimately place less stress on your body.

Symptoms

Not all foot injuries affecting runners are necessarily down to a particular running gait; it is rarely that simple to diagnose how a foot problem developed . Simply being an overpronator does not mean that a foot injury has been caused by the running gait and it could be due to a number of factors. However mild to severe overpronators tend to be at a higher risk of developing musculoskeletal problems due to the increased stresses and strains which are placed on the body when the foot does not move in an optimum manner. The following injuries are frequently due to overpronation of the feet. Tarsal tunnel syndrome. Shin splints. Anterior compartment syndrome. Plantar fasciitis. Achilles tendonitis. Bunions. Sesamoiditis. Stress fractures. Back and hip pain. Ankle pain.

Diagnosis

Bunions, calluses and crooked toes may indicate alignment problems. So, it is important to ascertain the condition of a client's toes. Check the big toe to determine if the first joint of the toe is swollen, has a callus or bunion, and/or looks as though it abducts (i.e., hallux valgus) rather than pointing straight ahead. Also, look to see if the lesser toes seem to "curl up" (i.e., the person has hammer or claw toes). This may be indicative of damage to, or inflexibility of the plantar fascia caused by excessive flattening of the foot.Foot Pronation

Non Surgical Treatment

There are exercises that you can do to help deal with the effects and treat the cause. Obviously you can opt for an insert into your shoe either by way of your sports shop or go see a podiatrist. Like anything in your body that is not working correctly; you will have to manage your condition. Don't put off dealing with the problem as it will manifest associated issues along the alignment and as far up as your neck. If it's mild pronantion, I suggest running barefoot. If you can't do this then don't wear shoes at all at home or in the office as much as possible. Give your calf muscles a huge stretch everyday as these with the ligaments from the foot up to the muscle get tight and are linked to your pain. Loosen your calf muscles as much as possible. Great exercise is to sit barefoot with a marble on the floor in front of you. Grab the marble with your toes and try to hold it tight in the middle of the base of your foot. Ping pong balls and even golf balls work. Do this each night and combined with calf stretches you'll start to correct the muscle alignment gradually in the foot. Put more attention into massaging your feet, standing with a good posture, stretching your feet, ankles and calf muscles. Lastly, if you are fat this will not help at all. You must lose weight swimming, cycling and eradicating sugar and fat from your diet. The added strain on the foot by being a fat body compounds the problems and inhibits corrective results that you are after.

Prevention

Custom-made orthotics will reduce the twisting of the leg muscles as they enter the foot, by maintaining a normal alignment of the bones and joints of the foot. If the bones and joints are aligned properly, by reducing the pronation, the muscles can run straight to their attachments in the foot, without twisting to get to these bones. This action of custom-made orthotics will reduce Achilles Tendonitis shin splints; ankle, knee, hip, and lower back pain; and leg cramps. This action will also allow the leg muscles to work more efficiently, thus allowing you to walk and run with less effort.

May 19 2015

karren46

Will Calcaneal Apophysitis Require Surgical Procedures?

Overview

A syndrome of heel pain in skeletally immature individuals. The formal name is: calcaneal apophysitis. The pain is thought to arise from the growth plate (apophysis) and epiphysis. It is thought to be an overuse phenomena. Overloading of the apophysis by both traction (due to Achilles tendon) and compression (sue to weightbearing) have been implicated. Reversible pathologic alterations occur in the apophysis, which cause secondary pain. It is the growth plate and its bone, at the back of the heel bone (calcaneus), whose presence allows for longitudinal growth of calcaneus.

Causes

At birth, most of our foot bones are still made of cartilage, which ossifies (becomes bony) over the first few years of life. At the back of the heel, there is a growth plate that is attached to the main body of the heel bone by a cartilaginous join. At about the age of 14-15 years, this area of cartilage between the growth plate and the heel bone ossifies, fusing the area to the heel. Sever?s disease occurs when there is too much motion or strain across the growth plate, resulting in this area becoming inflamed and painful.

Symptoms

The pain associated with Sever's disease is usually felt along the back of the heel and becomes worse when running or walking. In some children, the pain is so severe they may limp when walking. One of the diagnostic tests for Sever's disease is the "squeeze test". Squeezing both sides of the heel together will produce immediate discomfort. Many children feel pain immediately upon waking and may have calf muscle stiffness in the morning.

Diagnosis

This can include physical examination and x-ray evaluation. X-rays may show some increased density or sclerosis of the apophysis (island of bone on the back of the heel). This problem may be on one side or bilateral.

Non Surgical Treatment

Physiotherapy treatment to improve range of the ankle and descrease soft tissue tightness. Orthotics to control excessive motion of the foot. Icing the painful area. Use of topical anti-inflammatory cream. Taping of the foot during exercise. Stretching, only if recommended by the physiotherapist.

April 14 2015

karren46

What Causes Adult Aquired FlatFoot ?

Overview
Most flat feet are not painful, particularly those flat feet seen in children. In the adult acquired flatfoot, pain occurs because soft tissues (tendons and ligaments) have been torn. The deformity progresses or worsens because once the vital ligaments and posterior tibial tendon are lost, nothing can take their place to hold up the arch of the foot. The painful, progressive adult acquired flatfoot affects women four times as frequently as men. It occurs in middle to older age people with a mean age of 60 years. Most people who develop the condition already have flat feet. A change occurs in one foot where the arch begins to flatten more than before, with pain and swelling developing on the inside of the ankle. Why this event occurs in some people (female more than male) and only in one foot remains poorly understood. Contributing factors increasing the risk of adult acquired flatfoot are diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Acquired flat foot

Causes
A person with flat feet has greater load placed on the posterior tibial tendon which is the main tendon unit supporting up the arch of the foot. Throughout life, aging leads to decreased strength of muscles, tendons and ligaments. The blood supply diminishes to tendons with aging as arteries narrow. Heavier, obese patients have more weight on the arch and have greater narrowing of arteries due to atherosclerosis. In some people, the posterior tibial tendon finally gives out or tears. This is not a sudden event in most cases. Rather, it is a slow, gradual stretching followed by inflammation and degeneration of the tendon. Once the posterior tibial tendon stretches, the ligaments of the arch stretch and tear. The bones of the arch then move out of position with body weight pressing down from above. The foot rotates inward at the ankle in a movement called pronation. The arch appears collapsed, and the heel bone is tilted to the inside. The deformity can progress until the foot literally dislocates outward from under the ankle joint.

Symptoms
Most people will notice mild to extreme pain in their feet. Below outlines some signs and symptoms of AAFD. Trouble walking or standing for any duration. Pain and swelling on the inside of the ankle. Bump on the bottom of the foot. Ulcer or wound developing on the outer aspects of foot.

Diagnosis
The adult acquired flatfoot, secondary to posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, is diagnosed in a number of ways with no single test proven to be totally reliable. The most accurate diagnosis is made by a skilled clinician utilizing observation and hands on evaluation of the foot and ankle. Observation of the foot in a walking examination is most reliable. The affected foot appears more pronated and deformed compared to the unaffected foot. Muscle testing will show a strength deficit. An easy test to perform in the office is the single foot raise. A patient is asked to step with full body weight on the symptomatic foot, keeping the unaffected foot off the ground. The patient is then instructed to "raise up on the tip toes" of the affected foot. If the posterior tibial tendon has been attenuated or ruptured, the patient will be unable to lift the heel off the floor and rise onto the toes. In less severe cases, the patient will be able to rise on the toes, but the heel will not be noted to invert as it normally does when we rise onto the toes. X-rays can be helpful but are not diagnostic of the adult acquired flatfoot. Both feet - the symptomatic and asymptomatic - will demonstrate a flatfoot deformity on x-ray. Careful observation may show a greater severity of deformity on the affected side.

Non surgical Treatment
Treating PTTD is almost always easier the earlier you catch it. So, the first step in treatment is to see your doctor as soon as you begin experiencing painful symptoms. However, once your condition has been diagnosed, your podiatrist will likely try to give the upset tendon a bit of a break so it?ll calm down and stop being so painful. This can often be accomplished by immobilizing the foot using tape and padding, braces, or casts, depending on what your podiatrist believes will work best for you, and depending on the severity of your condition. You may also be instructed to reduce inflammation by applying ice to the area (usually 40 minutes on and 20 minutes off, with a thin towel between you and the ice). Or, you might take anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen (steroidal anti-inflammatory meds are actually likely to make this problem worse, and are not usually recommended in treating PTTD), or use ultrasound therapy. Once the inflammation has gone down a bit, your podiatrist may recommend using orthotics (prescription shoe inserts) to support your damaged arch. Ankle braces can also be helpful. Adult acquired flat feet

Surgical Treatment
Flatfoot reconstruction (osteotomy). This is often recommended for flexible flatfoot condition. Flatfoot reconstruction involves cutting and shifting the heel bone into a more neutral position, transferring the tendon used to flex the lesser toes (all but the big toe) to strengthen the posterior tibial tendon, and lengthening the calf muscle. Fusion (also known as triple arthrodesis). Fusion involves fusing, or making stiff, three joints in the back of the foot the subtalar, talonavicular, and calcaneocuboid joints, to realign the foot and give it a more natural shape. Pins or screws hold the area in place until it heals. Fusion is often recommended for a rigid flatfoot deformity or evidence of arthritis. Both of these surgeries can provide excellent pain relief and correction.

March 27 2015

karren46

What Causes Heel Serious Pain

Overview

Heel Discomfort

Heel pain is a common symptom that has many possible causes. Although Heel Pain sometimes is caused by a systemic (body-wide) illness, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout, it usually is a local condition that affects only the foot.

Causes

In the majority of cases, heel pain has a mechanical cause. It may also be caused by arthritis, infection, an autoimmune problem trauma, a neurological problem, or some other systemic condition (condition that affects the whole body).

Symptoms

Usually worse with the first few steps in the morning or at the initial point of activity. The latter usually gets better with continued activity (squeaky hinge analogy). Walking, running, sprinting, hill running and jumping will increase the pain. Often, the natural response is to walk on the outside of the foot - in supination - to lessen the stress on the plantar fascia - resulting in new problems.

Diagnosis

After you have described your foot symptoms, your doctor will want to know more details about your pain, your medical history and lifestyle, including. Whether your pain is worse at specific times of the day or after specific activities. Any recent injury to the area. Your medical and orthopedic history, especially any history of diabetes, arthritis or injury to your foot or leg. Your age and occupation. Your recreational activities, including sports and exercise programs. The type of shoes you usually wear, how well they fit, and how frequently you buy a new pair. Your doctor will examine you, including. An evaluation of your gait. While you are barefoot, your doctor will ask you to stand still and to walk in order to evaluate how your foot moves as you walk. An examination of your feet. Your doctor may compare your feet for any differences between them. Then your doctor may examine your painful foot for signs of tenderness, swelling, discoloration, muscle weakness and decreased range of motion. A neurological examination. The nerves and muscles may be evaluated by checking strength, sensation and reflexes. In addition to examining you, your health care professional may want to examine your shoes. Signs of excessive wear in certain parts of a shoe can provide valuable clues to problems in the way you walk and poor bone alignment. Depending on the results of your physical examination, you may need foot X-rays or other diagnostic tests.

Non Surgical Treatment

Shoes, orthoses, splinting and/or immobilization form the cornerstone for successful functional management of plantar fasciitis.When you take the overuse nature of plantar fasciitis into account and attempt to re-establish the windlass mechanism of the foot, there is an enhanced potential for success. Unfortunately, too little attention has been directed to appropriately managing the shoes worn during treatment for plantar fasciitis. Emphasising motion control and stability type athletic shoes (that provide a firm heel cup, instep rigidity, longitudinal integrity and a well-integrated shoe upper) can help decrease excess eccentric tissue strain. The shoe also serves as a vital and functional link between an orthotic and the foot. Orthoses have long been considered to be a reliable method for treating plantar fasciitis. Considerable debate has been waged over the benefits of over-the-counter (OTC), prefabricated and prescription foot and/or ankle orthoses. Heel cushions, heel cups and cushioning pads appear to provide immediate pain relief for many people who have plantar fasciitis.This relief is frequently short-lived and requires other treatment modalities for success.Neutral position taping and strapping of the foot provides temporary symptomatic relief of pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Although the functional benefits are temporary and likely do not last longer than 10 minutes with exercise, the soft tissue compression and symptomatic relief afforded by the strapping can last for nearly a week.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery is a last resort in the treatment of heel pain. Physicians have developed many procedures in the last 100 years to try to cure heel pain. Most procedures that are commonly used today focus on several areas, remove the bone spur (if one is present), release the plantar fascia (plantar fasciotomy), release pressure on the small nerves in the area. Usually the procedure is done through a small incision on the inside edge of the foot, although some surgeons now perform this type of surgery using an endoscope. An endoscope is a tiny TV camera that can be inserted into a joint or under the skin to allow the surgeon to see the structures involved in the surgery. By using the endoscope, a surgeon can complete the surgery with a smaller incision and presumably less damage to normal tissues. It is unclear whether an endoscopic procedure for this condition is better than the traditional small incision. Surgery usually involves identifying the area where the plantar fascia attaches to the heel and releasing the fascia partially from the bone. If a small spur is present this is removed. The small nerves that travel under the plantar fascia are identified and released from anything that seems to be causing pressure on the nerves. This surgery can usually be done on an outpatient basis. This means you can leave the hospital the same day.

Prevention

Feet Pain

Wearing real good, supportive shoes are a great way to avoid heel pain. Usually, New Balance is a good shoe to wear, just for everyday shoe gear. By wearing proper footwear and performing thorough stretches, athletes can help prevent frequent heel pain. If you are starting to get a little discomfort or pain in the feet or heel, know that pain is not normal. So if you are having pain, you should be proactive and visit our office. If you let heel pain get out of control you could run into several other problems. It is always suggested to visit a podiatrist whenever you are experiencing pain.
Tags: Heel Pain

March 07 2015

karren46

Achilles Tendinitis Treatments And Causes

Overview

Achilles TendonAchilles tendinitis is often a misnomer, as most problems associated with the Achilles tendon are not strictly an inflammatory response. A more appropriate term, which most experts now use, is Achilles tendinopathy which includes, Tendinosis, microtears in the tissues in and around the tendon. Tendinitis, inflammation of the tendon Most cases of Achilles tendon pain is the result of tendinosis. Tendon inflammation (tendinitis) is rarely the cause of tendon pain. Achilles tendinopathy is a common condition that occurs particularly in athletes and can be difficult to treat due to the limited vascular supply of the tendon and the stress within the Achilles tendon with every step. Evidence indicates that treatment incorporating custom foot orthoses can improve this condition by making the foot a more effective lever in gait. A 2008 study reported between 50 and 100% relief (average 92%) from Achilles tendinopathy symptoms with the use of custom foot orthoses.

Causes

Over-pronation, injury and overstresses of the tendon are some of the most common causes. Risk factors include tight heel cords, poor foot alignment, and recent changes in activities or shoes. During a normal gait cycle, the upper and lower leg rotate in unison (i.e. internally during pronation and externally during supination). However, when a person over-pronates, the lower leg is locked into the foot and therefore continues to rotate internally past the end of the contact phase while the femur begins to rotate externally at the beginning of midstance. The Gastrocnemius muscle is attached to the upper leg and rotates externally while the Soleus muscle is attached to the lower leg and rotates internally during pronation. The resulting counter rotation of the upper and lower leg causes a shearing force to occur in the Achilles tendon. This counter rotation twists the tendon at its weakest area, namely the Achilles tendon itself, and causes the inflammation. Since the tendon is avascular, once inflammation sets in, it tends to be chronic.

Symptoms

The onset of the symptoms of Achilles tendonitis tend to be gradual, with symptoms usually developing over a period of several days, or even weeks. Symptoms may include, Pain, this may be mild at first and may only be noticeable after exercise. Over time the pain may become constant and severe. Stiffness, this is usually relieved by activity. Sluggishness in the leg. Tenderness, particularly in the morning and most commonly felt just above where the tendon attaches to the heel bone. Swelling.

Diagnosis

A doctor or professional therapist will confirm a diagnosis, identify and correct possible causes, apply treatment and prescribe eccentric rehabilitation exercises. An MRI or Ultrasound scan can determine the extent of the injury and indicate a precise diagnosis. Gait analysis along with a physical assessment will identify any possible biomechanical factors such as over pronation which may have contributed to the achilles tendonitis and training methods will be considered. Biomechanical problems can be corrected with the use of orthotic inserts and selection of correct footwear.

Nonsurgical Treatment

Treatment for achilles tendonitis is based around initially reducing pain and inflammation, stretching the muscles out and a gradual return to activity. No one single approach may cure achilles tendonitis, particularly a chronic condition but a combination of treatment approaches and patience will work best. It is essential the correct treatment is started as soon as possible in the acute stage to avoid the injury becoming chronic. Acute achilles tendonitis requires rest. Continuing to train on a painful achilles tendon could lead to the injury becoming chronic and more difficult to treat. Applying ice or cold therapy as soon as possible to a painful achilles tendon will reduce pain and inflammation. After the first 24 to 48 hours alternating hot and cold or just heat may be more beneficial. Tendons work better when they are warm but if they are painful then rest and ice. Wear a heel pad to raise the heel and shorten the calf muscles which in turn reduces some of the strain on the achilles tendon. This should only be a temporary measure while the achilles tendon is healing. An achilles tendon taping technique can aid rest by supporting the tendon with elastic bandages. This is an excellent way of taking the load off the tendon if you have to walk around on your feet as well as protecting the tendon when returning to full fitness. Achilles tendon exercisesMake sure you have the right running shoes for your foot type and the sport. If you are a runner that over-pronates then a motion control or support running shoe may be needed. Visit a specialist running shop for advice. In the later stages apply heat, especially before exercise. The tendon will perform better when warm. Finish with cold after training to reduce any inflammation.

Achilles Tendon

Surgical Treatment

There are two types of Achilles repair surgery for tendonitis (inflammation of the Achilles Tendon), if nonsurgical treatments aren't effective. Gastrocnemius recession - The orthopaedic surgeon lengthens the calf muscles to reduce stress on your Achilles tendon. D?bridement and repair - During this procedure, the surgeon removes the damaged part of the Achilles tendon and repairs the remaining tendon with sutures or stitches. Debridement is done when the tendon has less than 50% damage.

Prevention

If you're just getting started with your training, be sure to stretch after running, and start slowly, increasing your mileage by no more than 10% per week. Strengthen your calf muscles with exercises such as toe raises. Work low-impact cross-training activities, such as cycling and swimming, into your training.

January 17 2015

karren46

What Is Plantar Fasciitis

Heel Pain

Overview

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot disorder that affects more than two million people every year, especially runners. It is inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue on the bottom of the foot. The most common area of pain is directly on the bottom of the heel, although some people may only have pain in the arch of the foot. Diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is typically done through a physical examination, which includes listening to the patient history, palpation of the heel and possibly x-rays.



Causes

Plantar Fasciitis is caused by abnormal pronation of the foot. Contributing factors are obesity, weight gain, jobs that require a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces, badly worn shoes with little support, and also inactivity. As a result of over-pronation, with every step the Plantar Fascia (band of tissue under the foot) is being stretched, resulting in inflammation, irritation and pain at the attachment of the fascia into the heel bone. In some cases the pain is felt under the foot, in the arch. Continuous pulling of the fascia at the heel bone, eventually may lead to the development of bony growth on the heel. This is called a heel spur. When you’re at rest, such as while sleeping, the Plantar Fascia tightens and shortens. When body weight is rapidly applied to the foot, the Fascia must stretch and quickly lengthen, causing micro-tears in the Fascia. As a result, the foot pain is more severe with your first steps in the morning, or after sitting for a long period. Plantar Fasciitis is more likely to happen if you suffer from over-pronation (flattening of the arch), you stand or walk on hard surfaces, for long periods, you are overweight or pregnant, you have tight calf muscles.



Symptoms

Plantar fasciitis is characterized by the following signs and symptoms. Acute plantar fasciitis, pain is usually worse in the morning but may improve when activity continues; if the plantar fasciitis is severe, activity will exacerbate the pain, pain will worsen during the day and may radiate to calf or forefoot, pain may be described anywhere from "minor pulling" sensation, to "burning", or to "knife-like", the plantar fascia may be taut or thickened, passive stretching of the plantar fascia or the patient standing on their toes may exacerbate symptoms, acute tenderness deep in the heel-pad along the insertion of the plantar aponeurosis at the medial calcaneal tuberosity and along the length of the plantar fascia, may have localized swelling. Chronic plantar fasciitis, plantar fasciitis is classified as "chronic" if it has not resolved after six months, pain occurs more distally along the aponeurosis and spreads into the Achilles tendon.



Diagnosis

If you see a doctor for heel pain, he or she will first ask questions about where you feel the pain. If plantar fasciitis is suspected, the doctor will ask about what activities you've been doing that might be putting you at risk. The doctor will also examine your foot by pressing on it or asking you to flex it to see if that makes the pain worse. If something else might be causing the pain, like a heel spur or a bone fracture, the doctor may order an X-ray to take a look at the bones of your feet. In rare cases, if heel pain doesn't respond to regular treatments, the doctor also might order an MRI scan of your foot. The good news about plantar fasciitis is that it usually goes away after a few months if you do a few simple things like stretching exercises and cutting back on activities that might have caused the problem. Taking over-the-counter medicines can help with pain. It's rare that people need surgery for plantar fasciitis. Doctors only do surgery as a last resort if nothing else eases the pain.



Non Surgical Treatment

First check your shoes for too much midfoot flexibility and check your training for changes. A detailed evaluation of changes in your training is necessary. You should start with what is called "relative rest" which means a decrease in workout intensity, duration of session and decrease in the number of sessions per week. The most important part of self treatment for this condition is being sure that your shoes offer sufficient stability and are optimal in controlling the forces that contribute to plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. Check your running shoes to make sure that they are not excessively worn. They should bend only at the ball of the foot, where your toes attach to the foot. This is vital! Avoid any shoe that bends in the center of the arch or behind the ball of the foot. It offers insufficient support and will stress your plantar fascia. The human foot was not designed to bend here and neither should a shoe be designed to do this. You should also be doing gentle calf stretching exercises. This will reduce stress on the plantar fascia in two ways. The first manner in which a relaxation of the tension in the calf muscles can help heel pain is that it will reduce the direct pull backwards on the heel bone (calcaneus). The second reason is a little bit more complicated, but essentially it is that a tight achilles tendon and calf muscles causes the rearfoot to move in a manner that causes over pronation as your leg and body move forward over your foot. So go ahead and gently stretch the calf muscle by doing the runner's wall leaning stretch. To strengthen the muscles in your arch toe curls or "doming" can be done. Toe curls may be done by placing a towel on a kitchen floor and then curling your toes to pull the towel towards you. This exercise may also be done without the towel against the resistance of the floor.

Pain In The Heel



Surgical Treatment

Most studies indicate that 95% of those afflicted with plantar fasciitis are able to relieve their heel pain with nonsurgical treatments. If you are one of the few people whose symptoms don't improve with other treatments, your doctor may recommend plantar fascia release surgery. Plantar fascia release involves cutting part of the plantar fascia ligament in order to release the tension and relieve the inflammation of the ligament. Overall, the success rate of surgical release is 70 to 90 percent in patients with plantar fasciitis. While the success rate is very high following surgery, one should be aware that there is often a prolonged postoperative period of discomfort similar to the discomfort experienced prior to surgery. This pain usually will abate within 2-3 months. One should always be sure to understand all the risks associated with any surgery they are considering.



Stretching Exercises

Stretching exercises for the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia are recommend to relieve pain and aid in the healing process. Sometimes application of athletic tape is recommended. In moderate or severe cases of plantar fasciitis, your doctor may recommend you wearing a night splint, which will stretch the arch of your foot and calf while you sleep. This helps to lengthen the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia for symptom relief. Depending on the severity of your plantar fasciitis, your physician may prescribe a store-bought orthotic (arch support) or custom-fitted orthotic to help distribute your foot pressure more evenly.

January 11 2015

karren46

What Is Heel Pain And How One Can Overcome It

Plantar Fascitis

Overview

Plantar fasciitis: Inflammation of the plantar fascia, the bowstring-like tissue that stretches from the heel bone to the base of the toes. Plantar fasciitis can be due to calcaneal spurs, which typically cause localized tenderness and pain that is made worse by stepping down on the heel. Plantar fasciitis may be related to physical activity overload, abnormal foot mechanics, or may be due to underlying diseases that cause arthritis, such as Reiter disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Treatment is designed to decrease inflammation and avoid reinjury. Icing reduces pain and inflammation. Anti-inflammatory agents, such as ibuprofen and injections of cortisone, can help. Infrequently, surgery is done on chronically inflamed spurs. A donut-shaped shoe insert can take pressure off a calcaneal spur and lessen plantar fasciitis.



Causes

Plantar fasciitis is the most common injury of the plantar fascia and is the most common cause of heel pain. Approximately 10% of people have plantar fasciitis at some point during their lifetime. It is commonly associated with long periods of standing and is much more prevalent in individuals with excessive inward rolling of the foot, which is seen with flat feet. Among non-athletic populations, plantar fasciitis is associated with obesity and lack of physical exercise.



Symptoms

Most people with plantar fasciitis have pain when they take their first steps after they get out of bed or sit for a long time. You may have less stiffness and pain after you take a few steps. But your foot may hurt more as the day goes on. It may hurt the most when you climb stairs or after you stand for a long time. If you have foot pain at night, you may have a different problem, such as arthritis , or a nerve problem such as tarsal tunnel syndrome.



Diagnosis

If you see a doctor for heel pain, he or she will first ask questions about where you feel the pain. If plantar fasciitis is suspected, the doctor will ask about what activities you've been doing that might be putting you at risk. The doctor will also examine your foot by pressing on it or asking you to flex it to see if that makes the pain worse. If something else might be causing the pain, like a heel spur or a bone fracture, the doctor may order an X-ray to take a look at the bones of your feet. In rare cases, if heel pain doesn't respond to regular treatments, the doctor also might order an MRI scan of your foot. The good news about plantar fasciitis is that it usually goes away after a few months if you do a few simple things like stretching exercises and cutting back on activities that might have caused the problem. Taking over-the-counter medicines can help with pain. It's rare that people need surgery for plantar fasciitis. Doctors only do surgery as a last resort if nothing else eases the pain.



Non Surgical Treatment

Most health care providers agree that initial treatment for plantar fasciitis should be quite conservative. You'll probably be advised to avoid any exercise that is making your pain worse. Your doctor may also advise one or more of these treatment options. A heel pad. In plantar fasciitis, a heel pad is sometimes used to cushion the painful heel if you spend a great deal of time on your feet on hard surfaces. Also, over-the-counter or custom-made orthotics, which fit inside your shoes, may be constructed to address specific imbalances you may have with foot placement or gait. Stretching: Stretching exercises performed three to five times a day can help elongate the heel cord. Ice: You may be advised to apply ice packs to your heel or to use an ice block to massage the plantar fascia before going to bed each night. Pain relievers: Simple over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, are often helpful in decreasing inflammation and pain. If you have stomach trouble from such drugs, your health care provider may prescribe an alternative. A night splint: A night splint is sometimes used to hold your foot at a specific angle, which prevents the plantar fascia from shortening during sleep. Ultrasound: Ultrasound therapy can be performed to decrease inflammation and aid healing. Steroid injections: Anti-inflammatory steroid injections directly into the tissue around your heel may be temporarily helpful. However, if these injections are used too many times, you may suffer other complications, such as shrinking of the fat pad of your heel, which you need for insulation. Loss of the fat pad could actually increase your pain, or could even rupture the plantar fascia in rare cases. Walking cast: In cases of long-term plantar fasciitis unresponsive to usual treatments, your doctor may recommend that you wear a short walking cast for about three weeks. This ensures that your foot is held in a position that allows the plantar fascia to heal in a stretched, rather than shortened, position. Shock wave therapy, Extracorporeal shock wave therapy which may be prescribed prior to considering surgery if your symptoms have persisted for more than six months. This treatment does not involve any actual incisions being made rather it uses a high intensity shock wave to stimulate healing of the plantar fascia.

Plantar Fascia



Surgical Treatment

In very rare cases plantar fascia surgery is suggested, as a last resort. In this case the surgeon makes an incision into the ligament, partially cutting the plantar fascia to release it. If a heel spur is present, the surgeon will remove it. Plantar Fasciitis surgery should always be considered the last resort when all the conventional treatment methods have failed to succeed. Endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF) is a form of surgery whereby two incisions are made around the heel and the ligament is being detached from the heel bone allowing the new ligament to develop in the same place. In some cases the surgeon may decide to remove the heel spur itself, if present. Just like any type of surgery, Plantar Fascia surgery comes with certain risks and side effects. For example, the arch of the foot may drop and become weak. Wearing an arch support after surgery is therefore recommended. Heel spur surgeries may also do some damage to veins and arteries of your foot that allow blood supply in the area. This will increase the time of recovery.

January 07 2015

karren46

What Is Pain Of The Heel

Plantar Fascitis

Overview

Plantar fasciitis refers to an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick, fibrous band running along the sole of the foot. Such inflammation results from direct injury to the plantar fascia, usually, repeated trauma to the tissue where the fascia attaches to the calcaneus or heel bone. The plantar fascia is critical in maintaining the foot’s complex arch system, also playing a role in balance and fine control of certain phases of the athlete’s gait. Injury to the plantar fascia is particularly painful and disabling for runners and can often prove stubbornly resistant to treatment. Rehabilitation is frequently a lengthy and frustrating process. For these reasons, care should be taken where possible to avoid such injury by means of preventative exercises and sensitivity to early warning signs.



Causes

Training on improper, hard and/or irregular surfaces as well as excessive track work in spiked shoes, or steep hill running, can stress the plantar fascia past its limits of elasticity, leading to injury. Finally, failure in the early season to warm up gradually gives the athlete insufficient time for the structures of the foot to re-acclimate and return to a proper fitness level for intensive exercise. Such unprepared and repeated trauma causes microscopic tearing, which may only be detected once full-blown plantar fasciitis and accompanying pain and debilitation have resulted. If the level of damage to the plantar fascia is significant, an inflammatory reaction of the heel bone can produce spike-like projections of new bone, known as heel spurs. Indeed, plantar fasciitis has occasionally been refereed to as heel spur syndrome, though such spurs are not the cause of the initial pain but are instead a further symptom of the problem. While such spurs are sometimes painless, in other cases they cause pain or disability in the athlete, and surgical intervention to remove them may be required. A dull, intermittent pain in the heel is typical, sometimes progressing to a sharp, sustained discomfort. Commonly, pain is worse in the morning or after sitting, later decreasing as the patient begins walking, though standing or walking for long periods usually brings renewal of the pain.



Symptoms

When a patient has plantar fasciitis, the connective tissue that forms the arch of the foot becomes inflamed (tendonitis) and degenerative (tendinosis)--these abnormalities cause plantar fasciitis and can make normal activities quite painful. Symptoms of plantar fasciitis are typically worsened early in the morning after sleep. At that time, the arch tissue is tight and simple movements stretch the contracted tissue. As you begin to loosen the foot, the pain usually subsides, but often returns with prolonged standing or walking.



Diagnosis

Diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is based on a medical history, the nature of symptoms, and the presence of localised tenderness in the heel. X-rays may be recommended to rule out other causes for the symptoms, such as bone fracture and to check for evidence of heel spurs. Blood tests may also be recommended.



Non Surgical Treatment

About 90% of plantar fasciitis cases are self-limited and will improve within six months with conservative treatment and within a year regardless of treatment. Many treatments have been proposed for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. First-line conservative approaches include rest, heat, ice, calf-strengthening exercises, techniques to stretch the calf muscles, achilles tendon, and plantar fascia, weight reduction in the overweight or obese, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin or ibuprofen. NSAIDs are commonly used to treat plantar fasciitis, but fail to resolve the pain in 20% of people. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is an effective treatment modality for plantar fasciitis pain unresponsive to conservative nonsurgical measures for at least three months. Corticosteroid injections are sometimes used for cases of plantar fasciitis refractory to more conservative measures. The injections may be an effective modality for short-term pain relief up to one month, but studies failed to show effective pain relief after three months. Notable risks of corticosteroid injections for plantar fasciitis include plantar fascia rupture, skin infection, nerve or muscle injury, or atrophy of the plantar fat pad. Custom orthotic devices have been demonstrated as an effective method to reduce plantar fasciitis pain for up to 12 weeks. Night splints for 1-3 months are used to relieve plantar fasciitis pain that has persisted for six months. The night splints are designed to position and maintain the ankle in a neutral position thereby passively stretching the calf and plantar fascia overnight during sleep. Other treatment approaches may include supportive footwear, arch taping, and physical therapy.

Heel Pain



Surgical Treatment

Most studies indicate that 95% of those afflicted with plantar fasciitis are able to relieve their heel pain with nonsurgical treatments. If you are one of the few people whose symptoms don't improve with other treatments, your doctor may recommend plantar fascia release surgery. Plantar fascia release involves cutting part of the plantar fascia ligament in order to release the tension and relieve the inflammation of the ligament. Overall, the success rate of surgical release is 70 to 90 percent in patients with plantar fasciitis. While the success rate is very high following surgery, one should be aware that there is often a prolonged postoperative period of discomfort similar to the discomfort experienced prior to surgery. This pain usually will abate within 2-3 months. One should always be sure to understand all the risks associated with any surgery they are considering.



Prevention

Preventing plantar fasciitis is crucial. There are many choices to help prevent the occurrence of this condition, and keep it from returning. One of the most important is maintaining a healthy weight in order to reduce tension on the plantar fascia. In addition, shoes are very important, and should fit well and provide ample cushioning and support throughout the heel, arch, and ball of the foot so that weight is distributed evenly throughout the foot. Try to avoid walking barefoot on hard surfaces and replace old shoes before they wear out, especially shoes that you run or exercise in. When exercising, start off slow and ease into new routines to prevent sudden or excessive stress on tissue. Lastly, keep your calf muscles and the tissue of your feet stretched. Greater flexibility in the tissue makes them less susceptible to damage.

January 01 2015

karren46

Treatments For Mallet Toes

Pain across the bottom of the foot at any point between the heel and the ball of the foot is often referred to as "arch pain” Although this description is non-specific, most arch pain is due to strain or inflammation Ball Of Foot Pain of the plantar fascia (a long ligament on the bottom of the foot). Wearing inappropriate footwear or foot problems like athlete's foot and Morton's neuroma are some of the factors that cause burning feet sensation.

These conditions include different types of arthritis , osteonecrosis , neuromas , tumors, or infections. Lastly, traumatic injuries, including fractures and ligament tears, can cause this type of foot pain. Treatment of foot pain often consists of anti-inflammatory medications , footwear modifications, and inserts for your shoes. When buying footwear, look for shoes with a wide toebox, good support, and avoid high heels. These pads help to take pressure off the ball of the foot. If some simple steps do not alleviate your symptoms, you should see your doctor to ensure you are receiving adequate treatment. In some rare situations, patients don't find relief with shoe modifications, and may require a surgical procedure. Remember that our shoes protect us from injury.

Those affected by inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and Achilles tendonitis are also likely to experience pain and swelling in the ankles. If the joints in the feet get affected by osteoarthritis, it gives rise to pain, stiffness, swelling in or around the joint, and restricted range of motion. Since pain in the feet could be caused due to a variety of reasons, the treatment will depend on the underlying cause. Many a time, pain could be experienced by people who perform high-impact exercises such as running, jogging and other sports. Those who have been experiencing pain while running must make sure that they wear a good quality footwear. Painkillers or steroids might be prescribed for the treatment of a sprained ankle.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain

Do not consume food items which you are allergic to. Keep dead skin off your lips by lightly scrubbing them at least twice a week using a mild, natural ingredient such as cornflour or a lemon juice-sugar pack. I had a long road workout two weeks ago and immediately after starting having pain on the ball of my foot in this area. I have also learned buying shoes online is easy.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain

Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa: A condition that causes blistering of the skin because of a mutation of a gene which in normal conditions helps in the formation of thread-like fibers that are anchoring filaments, which fix the epidermis to the basement membrane. Kanner Syndrome: Also referred to as Autism, this is one of the neuropsychiatric conditions typified by deficiencies in communication and social interaction, and abnormally repetitive behavior. Kaposi's Sarcoma: A kind of malignancy of the skin that usually afflicts the elderly, or those who have problems in their immune system, like AIDS. For example, a year of perfect health is regarded as equivalent to 1.0 QALY.

June 10 2014

karren46

Calluses And Corns On Toes

Be sure that the shoes you wear do not have any areas in them that create pressure on any part of your feet or toes. This seemed to be what spurred on foot sores for the uncle in my family that frequently dealt with this issue. Take your shoes off for awhile during the day to create a change in the pressure your feet experience. Wear seam free socks at all times to avoid places for sores to begin as well. Rocker Soles that are designed to decrease the pressure to the areas that are most susceptible to pain, like the ball of the foot A) Shoe Width and Length - Shoe width is just as important as its length for the diabetic walker. The correct shoe size is the one that fits the base of your toes which is the widest part of your foot There should also be a 1/2-inch (1.27 cm) to 3/8-inch (0.9525 cm) space between the end of the shoe and your longest toe. The problem of containing an infection in diabetics is huge. Doctors must remove shoes and socks of diabetics and examine their feet. Losing a foot has huge social and economic implications and should be prevented. Preventionpodiatric should be given to all patients especially at risk.Comprehensivescreening programs and treatment programs have been shown to reduce the risk ofamputation.Simple measures such as debridement of callus and the fitting ofappropriate shoes ,often with the help of an orthotist,may be all that isnecessary to prevent one of the most devastating and feared complications ofdiabetes,amputation. If you smoke, stop. Smoking decreases blood flow to your feet. Talk with your doctor or nurse if you need help quitting. Valid in USA only - Check with your local Foot Solutions store to confirm that they are an approved Medicare provider *** Who is Covered Under the Medicare Diabetic Footwear Benefit?diabetic foot ulcer treatment Do not use a heating pad or hot water bottle on your feet. Do not walk barefoot, especially on hot pavement or hot sandy beaches. Remove your shoes and socks during visits to your health care provider so that they can check your feet. Wear shoes at all times to protect your feet from injury. Before you put them on, always check the inside of your shoes for stones, nails, or rough areas that may hurt your feet. Change your broken-in shoes after 5 hours during the day to change the pressure points on your feet. Do not wear flip-flop sandals or stockings with seams. Both can cause pressure points. There are a few causes of blue toe syndrome but the most common is the breakage of a small piece of arterial plaque usually from the abdominal aorta-iliac-femoral arterial system (located in the abdomen and groin area) which then travels down the arterial tree into the small vessels of the foot where it becomes lodged. This is known as an embolism. All tissue distal (in front of) the blockage will then turn a bluish color which represents a lack of oxygen to the tissue. To keep athlete's foot at bay, it is often suggested to sprinkle anti-fungal foot powder between your toes. This is where sweat and moisture can accumulate. As with any medical condition, knowing when to seek professional medical help is crucial to timely interventions. An inflamed corn or callus may just be a limb-saving visit away from your nearest community podiatrist. For further information regarding this current treatment approach contact podiatrist melbourne Forest Hill on 9877 2077 or visit our website melbourne podiatrist to read more about these new exciting treatment options. Diabetes is a disease that can have a lot of complications. This chronic lifestyle disease can increase the risk of heart diseases, kidney disorders, blindness, circulatory problems, and it can even cause foot ulcers that can end up requiring amputation of the lower limbs. Consult with your physician and avail best treatment to get complete relief from diabetes and ulcers. One can also avail cream to treat ulcers; Coresatin Nonsteroidal Cream Supporting Therapy for Diabetic Foot Ulcers is best remedy for diabetic ulcers. About the Author People with diabetes have too much glucose (sugar) in their blood. This affects the blood vessels which results in poor circulation of blood. When the blood does not circulate properly, your feet does not receive the required amount of oxygen and nourishment. Edema often includes the swelling of the feet and hands as well. Fortunately there are many ways that you can prevent and treat edema.
Tags: Diabetic Foot

March 24 2014

karren46






March 23 2014

karren46






March 20 2014

karren46

Bunions: Causes, Picture, and More




Bunions: Causes, Picture, and More
Font SizeAAA
Understanding Bunions -- the Basics
What Is a Bunion?
Picture of BunionA bunion is an unnatural, bony hump that forms at the base of the big toe where it attaches to the foot. Often, the big toe deviates toward the other toes. When this occurs, the base of the big toe pushes outward on the first metatarsal bone -- which is the bone directly behind the big toe -- forming a bunion. If this happens on the little toe and fifth metatarsal, it's called a bunionette.

?

Understanding Bunions
Find out more about bunions:

Basics

Symptoms

Diagnosis and Treatment

Prevention

?

Because a bunion occurs at a joint, where the toe bends in normal walking, your entire body weight rests on the bunion at each step. Bunions can be extremely painful. They're also vulnerable to excess pressure and friction from shoes and can lead to the development of calluses.

What Causes Bunions?
Foot problems typically develop in early adulthood and get worse as the foot spreads with aging. For many people, bunions run in the family. They may be just one of several problems due to weak or poor foot structure. Bunions sometimes develop with arthritis. In people with leg length discrepancies, bunions usually form in the longer leg.

Women are especially prone to developing bunions. Years of wearing tight, poorly fitting shoes -- especially high-heeled, pointed shoes -- can bring on bunions. Such shoes gradually push the foot bones into an unnatural shape.



March 18 2014

karren46

Ankle Pain After Starting to Run | Runner's World

Ankle Pain After Starting to Run | Runner's World

Hi, my name is Jenny and I am new to running. I decided I needed to get back into shape after years of not doing anything. I am 34 and 140 pounds. I started running at the end of October of this year. I was feeling great and getting up at 5 a.m. every day of the week. I started out by walking and then gradually added running into my morning routine. About two weeks ago I started having pain in my ankles. The pain continued so I took some time off of the treadmill, thinking I may have done something to my ankle. The left ankle is feeling better but the right one does not seem to be getting better, I went back on the treadmill and ran 1 mile to see how it would go, and my right ankle did not feel good during the run or after.

To give you more information, I stretch before my workout and after my workout. Before I started to get back into shape I went to a running store and bought new running shoes. I just bought an ankle brace today, which seems to help. I guess I'm just looking for any advice.

Thank You

Jenny

Jenny-

Congratulations to you for your motivation, determination, and perseverance! Your enthusiasm is much admired and appreciated; however, it is also what often leads new runners into trouble. Unfortunately, doing the same thing every day, especially after long periods of inactivity, is not advisable. It's like going from 0 to 60mph in 60 seconds; which might be a good thing for cars, but not our bodies. It's a real dilemma because our minds are willing and our intentions are good, but our bodies simply can't keep up with that pace. Bodies need time to make adaptations to the physical demands of exercise; therefore, we need to proceed gradually, making incremental increases in a controlled manner, and allow for recovery time. Physiologically, it takes bones, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and connective tissue a minimum of 4 weeks to respond and strengthen to meet the new demands of exercise. When we do the same thing every day, we increase our injury risk because there is no recovery time allowing for adaptation. Health care professionals often recommend exercising every day, especially when the goal is weight loss, so mix things up. Variety gives us recovery time between workouts, even while still exercising, because we are not doing the same activity every day. For example, alternate walking/running days with weight training, or a stretch and tone class, yoga or a Pilates class. By alternating cardio-respiratory days with muscle strengthening/endurance/flexibility days we build a sound and strong body.

From your description, it sounds as though you may have an "over use" injury, which is simply a term used for covering a broad category of aches and pains resulting from doing too much, too soon. When pain persists for more than three days and, especially, when it is still present after taking several days off, it's best to see a physician. Your health care professional can provide a diagnosis and a proper treatment plan. If at all possible, find a physician that sees and treats runners and since your issue involves your ankles, a sports-related podiatrist or orthopedist may prove especially helpful. You also mention that you purchased new running shoes when you began training, which is good; however, did you have a shoe fit when you selected the shoe? Make certain you bring your running shoes with you to your doctor visit so they can be evaluated. It's important to determine whether or not they are the right shoes for you. You may need an additional insert for your shoes or even a different type of shoe. Recommended treatment plans may involve physical therapy, time off from running, and/or medication. If time off from walking or running is advised, ask about running alternatives like spinning, swimming, or other exercise classes. This will help you keep your exercise routine going and also maintain your fitness for when you able to return to running again.

When you are able to return to training, remember that exercise physically stresses the body and while this physical stress is a good thing (for the most part!) it triggers systemic adaptation. Bones become stronger, connective tissue toughens, muscle cells add more mitochondria for processing oxygen, our heart becomes stronger and more efficient, respiratory muscles become stronger, new capillary beds are built- which are akin to new highways that facilitate the delivery of much needed oxygen to working muscles. In addition, regular exercise stimulates an increase in the production of enzymes and hormones which are needed to burn fat for fuel but, all of these processes take time. These changes don't happen overnight. Take this adaptation time into consideration when beginning any exercise routine and even when changing an existing exercise routine. Whether just starting out, increasing mileage, or incorporating speed work, allow for adaptation time or risk injury.

Don't get discouraged! Injuries, unfortunately, are all too common, but they are good learning tools. If we don't push our limits, we will never know what they are, so chalk it up to experience. Injuries are a great reason to experiment with other forms of exercise, diversify our routine, and ultimately create an even better training plan!

All the best to you!

Susan S. Paul, MS



Susan Paul has coached more than 2,000 runners and is an exercise physiologist and program director for the Orlando Track Shack Foundation. For more information, visit www.trackshack.com.

Have a question for our beginners experts? Email it to beginners@rodale.com. NOTE: Due to the volume of mail, we regret that we cannot answer every email.
Tags:Ankle
Related Articlesthumbnail
Top 10 Newbie Training TipsOur beginner's expert shares what you need to know to start running.thumbnail
Should I Train With My Boyfriend?For new runners, training together could hurt or help the new healthy habit.thumbnail
How to Avoid 8 Common Race Day MistakesYou've done the training, now it's time to get to the starting line anxiety-free.thumbnail
Why Did I Get Injured?Running injuries happen for all kinds of reasons. Here's a few things to think about.

March 17 2014

karren46

Tarsals, Metatarsals, and Phalanges (Foot) - Lower Limb




Tarsals, Metatarsals, and Phalanges (Foot) - Lower Limb

The human foot and ankle are strong and complex mechanical structures containing more than 26 bones (tarsals/ankle, metatarsals/mid-bones, and phalanges/toes Figure 1), 33 joints (20 of which are actively articulated), and more than a hundred muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

The foot can be subdivided into the hindfoot, the midfoot, and the forefoot.

The hindfoot is composed of the talus or ankle bone and the calcaneus or heel bone.The two long bones of the lower leg, the tibia and fibula, are connected to the top of the talus to form the ankle.Connected to the talus at the subtalar joint, the calcaneus (the largest bone of the foot) is cushioned inferiorly by a layer of fat.

The five irregular bones of the midfoot (the cuboid, navicular, and three cuneiform bones) form the arches of the foot which serve as shock absorbers.The midfoot is connected to the hind- and fore-foot by muscles and the plantar fascia.

The forefoot is composed of five toes and the corresponding five proximal long bones forming the metatarsus .Similar to the fingers of the hand, the bones of the toes are called phalanges.The big toe has two phalanges, while the other four toes have three phalanges.The joints between the phalanges are called interphalangeal; those between the metatarsus and phalanges are called metatarsophalangeal (MTP).

Both the midfoot and forefoot constitute the dorsum (the area facing upwards while standing) and the planum (the area facing downwards while standing).

The human foot has two longitudinal arches and a transverse arch maintained by the interlocking shapes of the foot bones, strong ligaments, and pulling muscles during activity.The slight mobility of these arches when weight is applied to and removed from the foot makes walking and running more economical in terms of energy.As can be examined in a footprint, the medial longitudinal arch curves above the ground.This arch stretches from the heel bone over the "keystone" ankle bone to the three medial metatarsals.In contrast, the lateral longitudinal arch is very low. With the cuboid serving as its keystone, it redistributes part of the weight to the calcaneus and the distal end of the fifth metatarsal.The two longitudinal arches serve as pillars for the transverse arch which run obliquely across the tarsometatarsal joints.Excessive strain on the tendons and ligaments of the feet can result in fallen arches or flat feet.



March 15 2014

karren46

Foot Conditions | Achilles Tendon Problems | Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in the Greater Houston Area, TX




Foot Conditions | Achilles Tendon Problems | Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in the Greater Houston Area, TX

PRINTABLE BOOKLET

A Patient's Guide to Achilles Tendon Problems
A Patient's Guide to Achilles Tendon Problems
Introduction
Problems that affect the Achilles tendon include tendonitis, tendinopathy, tendocalcaneal bursitis, and tendonosis. Each of these conditions will be described and explained. These problems affect athletes most often, especially runners, basketball players, and anyone engaged in jumping sports. They are also common among both active and sedentary (inactive) middle-aged adults. These problems cause pain at the back of the calf. Severe cases may result in a rupture of the Achilles tendon.

This guide will help you understand
where the Achilles tendon is located what kinds of Achilles tendon problems there are how an injured Achilles tendon causes problems what treatment options are available
Anatomy
Where is the Achilles tendon, and what does it do?

The Achilles tendon is a strong, fibrous band that connects the calf muscle to the heel. The calf is actually formed by two muscles, the underlying soleus and the thick outer gastrocnemius. Together, they form the gastroc-soleus muscle group. When they contract, they pull on the Achilles tendon, causing your foot to point down and helping you rise on your toes. This powerful muscle group helps when you sprint, jump, or climb. Several different problems can occur that affect the Achilles tendon, some rather minor and some quite severe.
Tendocalcaneal Bursitis
A bursa is a fluid-filled sac designed to limit friction between rubbing parts. These sacs, or bursae, are found in many places in the body. When a bursa becomes inflamed, the condition is called bursitis. Tendocalcaneal bursitis is an inflammation in the bursa behind the heel bone. This bursa normally limits friction where the thick fibrous Achilles tendon that runs down the back of the calf glides up and down behind the heel.
Achilles Tendonitis
A violent strain can cause trauma to the calf muscles or the Achilles tendon. Sometimes this is referred to as tendonitis. This injury can happen during a strong contraction of the muscle, as when running or sprinting. Landing on the ground after a jump can force the foot upward, also causing injury. The strain can affect different portions of the muscles or tendon. For instance, the strain may occur in the center of the muscle. Or it may happen where the muscles join the Achilles tendon (called the musculotendinous junction).
Achilles Tendinopathy/Tendonosis
Chronic overuse may contribute to changes in the Achilles tendon as well, leading to degeneration and thickening of the tendon. Studies show there is no sign of inflammation with overuse injuries of tendons. Most experts now refer to this condition as tendinopathy or tendonosis instead of tendonitis.
Achilles Tendon Rupture
In severe cases, the force of a violent strain may even rupture the tendon. The classic example is a middle-aged tennis player or weekend warrior who places too much stress on the tendon and experiences a tearing of the tendon. In some instances, the rupture may be preceded by a period of tendonitis, which renders the tendon weaker than normal.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Foot Anatomy

Causes
How do these problems develop?

It's not entirely clear why these problems develop in some people but not in others. Changes in the normal alignment of the foot and leg may be part of the problem. Anyone with one leg shorter than the other is at increased risk of Achilles tendon problems.

For the athlete, sudden increases in training may be a key factor. Runners may add on miles or engage in excessive hill training while other athletes increase training intensity.Other risk factors include obesity, diabetes (or other endocrine disorders), aging, exposure to steroids, and taking fluoroquinolones (antibiotics).

Problems with the Achilles tendon seem to occur in different ways. Initially, irritation of the outer covering of the tendon, called the paratenon, causes paratendonitis. Paratendonitis is simply inflammation around the tendon. Inflammation of the tendocalcaneal bursa (described above) may also be present with paratendonitis. Either of these conditions may be due to repeated overuse or ill-fitting shoes that rub on the tendon or bursa.

As we age, our tendons can degenerate. Degeneration means that wear and tear occurs in the tendon over time and leads to a situation where the tendon is weaker than normal. Degeneration in a tendon usually shows up as a loss of the normal arrangement of the fibers of the tendon. Tendons are made up of strands of a material called collagen. (Think of a tendon as similar to a nylon rope and the strands of collagen as the nylon strands.) Some of the individual strands of the tendon become jumbled due to the degeneration, other fibers break, and the tendon loses strength.

The healing process in the tendon causes the tendon to become thickened as scar tissue tries to repair the tendon. This process can continue to the extent that a nodule forms within the tendon. This degenerative condition without inflammation is called tendonosis. The area of tendonosis in the tendon is weaker than normal tendon. Tiny tears in the tissue around the tendon occur with overuse. The weakened, degenerative tendon sets the stage for the possibility of actual rupture of the Achilles tendon.

Symptoms
What do these conditions feel like?

Tendocalcaneal bursitis usually begins with pain and irritation at the back of the heel. There may be visible redness and swelling in the area. The back of the shoe may further irritate the condition, making it difficult to tolerate shoe wear.

Achilles tendonitis usually occurs further up the leg, just above the heel bone itself. The Achilles tendon in this area may be noticeably thickened and tender to the touch. Pain is present with walking, especially when pushing off on the toes.

An Achilles tendon rupture is usually an unmistakable event. Some bystanders may report actually hearing the snap, and the victim of a rupture usually describes a sensation similar to being violently kicked in the calf. Following rupture the calf may swell, and the injured person usually can't rise on his toes.

Diagnosis
How do doctors identify the problem?

Diagnosis is almost always by clinical history and physical examination. The physical examination is used to determine where your leg hurts. The doctor will probably move your ankle in different positions and ask you to hold your foot against the doctor's pressure. By stretching the calf muscles and feeling where these muscles attach on the Achilles tendon, the doctor can begin to locate the problem area.

The doctor may run some simple tests if a rupture is suspected. One test involves simply feeling for a gap in the tendon where the rupture has occurred. However, swelling in the area can make it hard to feel a gap.

Another test is done with your leg positioned off the edge of the treatment table. The doctor squeezes your calf muscle to see if your foot bends downward. If your foot doesn't bend downward, it's highly likely that you have a ruptured Achilles tendon.

When the doctor is unsure whetherthe Achilles tendon has been ruptured, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. This is seldom the case. The MRI machine uses magnetic waves rather than X-rays to show the soft tissues of the body. The MRI creates images that look like slices and shows the tendons and ligaments very clearly. This test does not require any needles or special dye and is painless.

Your doctor may order an ultrasound test. An ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create an image of the body's organs and structures. The image can show if an Achilles tendon has partially or completely torn. This test can also be repeated over time to see if a tear has gotten worse.

By using the MRI and ultrasound tests, doctors can determine if surgery is needed. For example, a small tear may mean that a patient might only need physical therapy and not surgery.

Treatment
What treatment options are available?

Nonsurgical Treatment
Tendonitis/Tendinopathy

In the past, nonsurgical treatment for tendocalcaneal bursitis and Achilles tendonitis started with a combination of rest, ice, and anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen.

Since it is now recognized that many tendon problems occur without inflammation, the use of antiinflammatories and ice have come under question. In the case of true inflammation, the overuse of these modalities may prevent a normal, healing inflammatory process. Preventing inflammation needed to clean up cellular debris in the injured area may lead to delayed or incomplete healing. The result may be future chronic problems of tendonosis and/or tendinopathy.

Many experts suggest when there is any doubt about inflammation, treatment should proceed as if there are no inflammatory cells present. This approach focuses on pain relief and restoring proper motion and weight-bearing so you can return to your usual activities.

If there is an inflammatory process, then the condition should respond fairly quickly to drug and antiinflammatory interventions. Limiting, but not eliminating, inflammation is the new goal.

Physical therapy may be recommended for any of these tendon problems. Treatment will depend on what type of problem (tendonitis or tendinopathy/tendonosis) is present.

Your therapist will know when and how to apply cold modalities to reduce swelling and pain but still allow the healing inflammatory process. Physical therapy for chronic tendon problems may also include a special program of stretching and eccentric strengthening exercises. Your therapist will instruct you in a home care program.

Low-energy shock wave therapy has been used successfully for chronic tendinopathy. The procedure does not require anesthesia but it may take several treatment sessions. The vibration produced by the energy waves is applied to areas of tenderness while the affected foot and ankle are gently moved in all directions. Shock wave therapy works by turning off nerves responsible for pain without affecting motor function. It also stimulates soft-tissue healing by increasing blood supply to the area treated.

Tendonosis

If the problem is one of tendon tissue degeneration, healing and recovery may take longer. The injury will not respond to treatment designed to reduce inflammation. Correct treatment of tendonosis involves fostering new collagen tissue growth and improving the strength of the tendon. Rehabilitation following rupture of the tendon is quite different and is described later.

An acute injury needs rest. This can be done by limiting activities like walking on the sore leg. A small (one-quarter inch) heel lift placed in your shoe can minimize stress by putting slack in the calf muscle and Achilles tendon. Be sure to place a similar sized lift in the other shoe to keep everything aligned. A cortisone injection is not advised for this condition, due to the increased risk of rupture of the tendon following injection.
Tendon Rupture
Nonsurgical treatment for an Achilles tendon rupture is somewhat controversial. It is clear that treatment with a cast will allow the vast majority of tendon ruptures to heal, but the incidence of rerupture is increased in those patients treated with casting for eight weeks when compared with those undergoing surgery. In addition, the strength of the healed tendon is significantly less in patients who choose cast treatment. For these reasons, many orthopedists feel that Achilles tendon ruptures in younger active patients should be surgically repaired.

Surgery
Surgical treatment for Achilles tendonitis is not usually necessary for most patients. Surgery options range from a tenotomy (a simple release of the tendon) to a more involved, open approach of repair.

In some cases of persistent tendonitis and tendonosis a procedure calleddebridement of the Achilles tendon may be suggested to help treat the problem.

This procedure is usually done through an incision on the back of the ankle near the Achilles tendon. The tendon is identified, and any inflamed paratenon tissue (the covering of the tendon) is removed. The tendon is then split, and the degenerative portion of the tendon is removed. The split tendon is then repaired and allowed to heal. It is unclear why, but removing the degenerative portion of the tendon seems to stimulate repair of the tendon to a more normal state.

Surgery may also be suggested if you have a ruptured Achilles tendon. Reattaching the two ends of the tendon repairs the torn Achilles tendon. This procedure is usually done through an incision on the back of the ankle near the Achilles tendon. Numerous procedures have been developed to repair the tendon, but most involve sewing the two ends of the tendon together in some fashion. Some repair techniques have been developed to minimize the size of the incision.

In the past, the complications of surgical repair of the Achilles tendon made surgeons think twice before suggesting surgery. The complications arose because the skin where the incision must be made is thin and has a poor blood supply. This can lead to an increase in the chance of the wound not healing and infection setting in. Now that this is better recognized, the complication rate is lower and surgery is recommended more often.

Rehabilitation
What can I expect following treatment?

Nonsurgical Rehabilitation
Patients with mild symptoms of tendocalcaneal bursitis or Achilles tendonitis often do well with two to four weeks of physical therapy. Treatments such as ultrasound, moist heat, and massage are used to control pain and inflammation. As pain eases, treatment progresses to include stretching and strengthening exercises.

In cases of Achilles tendinopathy, or when a partial tendon tear is being treated without surgery, patients may require two to three months of physical therapy. A heel lift placed in your shoe helps take tension off the painful tendon. Ultrasound and massage are used to help the tendon heal.

Injured tendons shorten and need to be stretched. Only gentle stretches for the calf muscles and Achilles tendon are used at first. As the tendon heals and pain eases, more aggressive stretches are given.

As your condition improves, exercises to strengthen the calf muscles begin. Strengthening starts gradually using isometrics, exercises that work the muscles but protect the healing area. Eventually, specialized strengthening exercises, called eccentrics, are used. Eccentrics work the calf muscle while it lengthens. For example, if you stand on your tiptoes, the calf muscles work eccentrically to carefully lower your heels back to the ground.

Patients are gradually able to get back to normal activities. Athletes are guided in rehabilitation that is specific to their type of sport.

Nonsurgical treatment for a ruptured Achilles tendon is handled differently. This approach might be considered for the aging adult who has an inactive lifestyle. Nonsurgical treatment in this case allows the patient to heal while avoiding the potential complications of surgery. The patient's foot and ankleare placed in a cast for eight weeks. Casting the leg with the foot pointing downward brings the torn ends of the Achilles tendon together and holds them until scar tissue joins the damaged ends. A large heel lift is worn in the shoe for another six to eight weeks after the cast is taken off.

After Surgery
Traditionally, patients would be placed in a cast or brace for six to eight weeks after surgery to protect the repair and the skin incision. Crutches would be needed at first to keep from putting weight onto the foot. Complications can occur such as delayed healing, infection, and scarring. More serious problems such as tendon rupture andnerve damage can also occur.

Conditioning exercises during this period help patients maintain good general muscle strength and aerobic fitness. Upon removing the cast, a shoe with a fairly high heel is recommended for up to eight more weeks, at which time physical therapy begins.

Immobilizing the leg in a cast can cause joint stiffness, muscle wasting (atrophy), and blood clots. To avoid these problems, surgeons may have their patients start doing motion exercises very soon after surgery. Patients wear a splint that can easily be removed to do the exercises throughout the day. A crutch or cane may be used at first to help you avoid limping.

In this early-motion approach, physical therapy starts within the first few days after surgery. Therapy may be needed for four to five months. Ice, massage, and whirlpool treatments may be used at first to limit (but not completely prevent) swelling and pain. Massage and ultrasound help heal and strengthen the tendon.

Treatments progress to include more advanced mobility and strengthening exercises, some of which may be done in a pool. The buoyancy of the water helps people walk and exercise safely without putting too much tension on the healing tendon. The splint is worn while walking for six to eight weeks after surgery.

As your symptoms ease and your strength improves, you will be guided through advancing stages of exercise. Athletes begin running, cutting, and jumping drills by the fourth month after surgery. They are usually able to get back to their sport by six full months after surgery.

The physical therapist's goal is to help you keep your pain and swelling under control, improve your range of motion and strength, and ensure you regain a normal walking pattern. When you are well under way, regular visits to the therapist's office will end. Your therapist will continue to be a resource, but you will be in charge of doing your exercises as part of an ongoing home program.
*Disclaimer:*The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.All content provided by eORTHOPOD(R) is a registered trademark of Medical Multimedia Group, L.L.C..Content is the sole property of Medical Multimedia Group, LLC and used herein by permission. PRINTABLE BOOKLET

Meet our Foot and Ankle Specialists
Texas Medical Center
Pedro Cosculluela, M.D.*
Kevin E. Varner, M.D.*

Sugar Land
David Braunreiter, M.D. (primary care)
Kenneth M. Renney, M.D. (primary care)
Christopher K. Smith, M.D.
Ray R. Valdez, M.D.*

Willowbrook
Travis Hanson, M.D.*

Pearland
Pedro Cosculluela, M.D.*

West Houston/Katy
Pedro Cosculluela, M.D.*

Physicians marked with an asterisk (*) are fellowship-trained in the field of foot and ankle surgery.

To schedule an appointment with one of our foot or ankle specialists, visit the Request an Appointment page or contact us.

>> Back to top

Our SpecialtiesJoint Replacement (Arthroplasty) Sports Medicine Spine Surgery Hand & Wrist Surgery Foot & Ankle Surgery Physical Therapy
Where Does It Hurt?Head Neck and Spine Shoulder Elbow Hand or Wrist Hip Knee Leg Foot or Ankle
Our LocationsBaytown Clear Lake Houston Sports Park (HSP) Pearland Sugar Land Texas Medical Center Timmons (Greenway Plaza) West Houston/Katy Willowbrook
Follow Us Follow us on FacebookFollow us on YouTubeFollow us on TwitterAbout Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine | Privacy Policy and Web Disclaimer | Contact Us | Visit Houston Methodist WebsiteAcademically Affiliated with:Academically Affiliated with Weill Cornell Medical CollegeOfficial Health Care Provider for:Awards and Recognition:U.S.News & World Report's HospitalsH Texas Houstons Top Doctors 2011Super Doctors

March 14 2014

karren46

Athlete's foot - National Library of Medicine - PubMed Health

Athlete's foot - National Library of Medicine - PubMed Health

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. (C) 1997-2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

March 11 2014

karren46

Treatment For Heel Pain Using Plantar Fasciitis Stretching Exercises And Orthotic Shoe Inserts


If you experience foot pain caused by plantar fasciitis, you are most likely in search of successful plantar fasciitis pain therapy. You are not alone. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of foot pain. This condition is due to an inflammation of the band of tissues (plantar fascia) connecting your heel to your toes. Many people say that the pain feels like a stabbing or burning sensation that starts at the heel and tends to spread forward into the toes. This is why many folks are so desperate to find plantar fasciitis pain therapy. It can be agonizingly painful and will get worse without therapy.

First check your shoes for too much midfoot flexibility and check your training for changes. A detailed evaluation of changes in your training is necessary. You should start with what is called "relative rest" which means a decrease in workout intensity, duration of session and decrease in the number of sessions per week. The most important part of self treatment for this condition is being sure that your shoes offer sufficient stability and are optimal in controlling the forces that contribute to plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. Check your running shoes to make sure that they are not excessively worn. This is vital!

Your next Plantar Fasciitis exercise is stretching of the plantar fascia using a bath towel. Put a rolled up towel under the ball of one foot, holding both ends of the towel with your left and right hand. Next, slowly pull the towel towards you, while keeping your knee straight (the other knee may be bent). Hold this position for 15 to 20 seconds. Repeat 4 times and change to the other foot, if necessary. (It's always good to do these exercises on both feet, even if you only experience heel pain in one foot, as this will help prevent the heel problem to come back in your other foot!)

Plantar fasciitis usually causes a sharp, stabbing pain on the inside of the bottom of the heel that can feel like an ice pick jabbing into your heel. Pain from plantar fasciitis is usually most severe when you first stand on your feet in the morning. Many people complain that the first step out of bed is the worst. Many also have pain as they get up and start to walk after sitting for a period of time while working at a desk or computer. This heel pain will usually subside as you walk, but can return with prolonged standing, walking or running.

The main question I get from runners is "can I run with plantar fasciitis?" The answer is yes, provided it has been diagnosed as plantar fasciitis. As I said earlier, plantar fasciitis is by far the most common form of heel pain, however there are other causes. Certain things can mimic the symptoms of plantar fasciitis, such as stress fractures on the heel bone, bone tumors, and bone cysts, or weak areas. The difference is that they are usually more painful when you run and will not subside (but instead get worse) while you are walking or running. A fractured heel bone will definitely interrupt your training schedule.plantar fasciitis shoes

If you've never experienced the pain that accompanies heel spurs and plantar fasciitis consider yourself lucky. This common problem is debilitating for many people. It causes intense heel pain or pain anywhere on the bottom of your foot. The symptoms are usually worse during the first few steps and gradually decrease once you walk around. However, some people are in pain all day long. It can effect a sedentary person, a skinny person, an overweight person, or an athlete. It alters how you walk and move throughout the day and may cause back pain. People look all over for remedies to their pain, usually to no avail.

Make an appointment with a podiatrist, a doctor who specializes in foot problems. While you are waiting to see your podiatrist, avoid standing and walking for long periods and do not run or engage in sports or carry heavy objects. Prepare an ice pack by placing crushed ice inside a plastic bag and wrapping a towel around the bag. Rest your feet on the ice pack for 15 to 20 minutes once or twice each day. Take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs daily. Wear running shoes with inside padding and good heel support instead of your regular shoes. Noninvasive Treatments

Other effective techniques include use of a slant board ( Figure 3 ) or placing a two-inch × four-inch piece of wood ( Figure 4 ) in areas where the patient stands for a prolonged time (e.g., workplaces, kitchen or stoves) to use in stretching the calf. Dynamic stretches such as rolling the foot arch over a 15-oz size can or a tennis ball are also useful ( Figure 5 ) Cross-friction massage above the plantar fascia ( Figure 6 ) and towel stretching ( Figure 7 ) may be done before getting out of bed and serve to stretch the plantar fascia.

You have painful plantar fasciitis , then you are probably looking a for quick and easy resolution to your pain. Right NOW! You think your alone with this one. More than 2,700,000 searches per month of people just like you looking for answers! You are probably not worried about the how's, why and what for's but are looking for plain and simple answer and techniques to get rid of your pain. This is the most common cause of foot problems in western society. This condition is a condition due to an inflammation of the flat band of tissue called the plantar fascia.

For more severe cases, surgery and other advanced treatments are often necessary. One example is the shock wave therapy. Here, the doctor needs to make use of sound waves to stimulate the affected area and treat it. This is often used for cases that have not received good results from conventional treatments mentioned earlier. The problem is that shock wave therapy often causes bruises and temporary pain. Surgery is the last resort. During surgery, doctors will have to remove or detach the never connecting the foot to the toes. This is necessary when the pain is almost unbearable already. plantar fasciitis shoes
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl